Custom Open Graph Deprecation Guide

On October 5, 2016, we announced the beginning of the deprecation of Custom Open Graph and Custom App Collections. We consistently received feedback from developers that creating Custom Open Graph actions and objects is time-consuming and overly complex. We are now working on other ways for people and developers to add context to what they're sharing, and to have people discover new apps that they might find interesting.

Details

  • Apps can no longer create new custom Open Graph action or object types, or publish Open Graph stories that use custom action or object types.
  • The Open Graph product in the App Dashboard is now read-only for apps using Graph API version 2.7 and lower, and has been removed for apps using version 2.8 or higher.
  • Custom App Collections have been removed from people's profiles.
  • Custom Open Graph Stories objects no longer support localization.
  • Two new action types are now available to all versions of the Graph API: games.plays and books.rates

Because all non-Open Graph API shares are required to be explicitly shared, implicit shares of Custom Open Graph stories aren't possible.

Action Required

There are two options to replace Custom Open Graph stories:

  1. Use built-in Open Graph actions, including the new games.plays, which posts only to people's activity log, and books.rates.
  2. Or use standard link, quote, photo, video, or multi-media share.

Below are examples of what it would look like for our sample app, Friend Smash, to stop using Custom Open Graph action types and object types and switch to another sharing type.

First, here is an example of Custom Open Graph sharing as it behaves currently. There is the custom action type “Smash” with two potential custom object types, “celebrity” or “profile.” In this example, the specific object being shared is “a person.”

If we were to switch to using the Built-in Open Graph action type, games.plays, the header of the story would change — and your app name would become the “object” being shared. We also recommend, though it isn't required, that you consider changing the link's title and description at the same time with Open Graph metatags to provide as much context and information as you'd like to include for the shared story. For example:

The other option is to forego Open Graph stories entirely, and create a standard link share. We also recommend, though it isn't required, that you consider changing the link's title and description at the same time with Open Graph metatags to provide as much context and information as you'd like to include for the shared story. For example:

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